Wednesday, Nov. 19 — Tait’s 8

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Theoren_Fleury_Vipers•Retired NHLer Theoren Fluery is in Edmonton today promoting his new book Conversations with a Rattlesnake. Theo teams up with therapist Kim Bathel to create more awareness about sexual abuse of young people. Tough subject, absolutely. But we have to talk about it, absoutely.

 

 

 

 

 

• It’s a big day for Norquest College who is launching their Maximizing Opportunities – The NorQuest Campaign. Goal: $20 million. And a major announcement will be made about the naming of the college’s new academic building.

• The Eskimos are having a closed practice today. Closed, you understand — which makes us wonder if that means it’s haircut day for Bryan Hall.

• Sun photo editor Tom Braid is always doing something interesting. For the last couple of years he has carried a small to medium amount of empty bottles in the trunk of his car. When Tom’s covering a story he usually comes across a bottle picker a couple of times a month. “I will stop and give them to the guy,” says Tom, adding they are always thankful.

• Which do you think is more challenging for referees to control in minor hockey: a tied game in the last minute, or a 5-0 game in the final minute?

• Congratulations to Marjorie Bencz who celebrated a significant anniversary as executive director of Edmonton’s Food Bank Oct. 10. In fact, mayor Don proclaimed it Marjorie Bencz Day in Edmonton.

• Big game tonight with the Oilers and Canucks at Rexall. Vancouver Canuck coach Will Desjardines always carries a clipboard with him when he’s on the bench. Always. Which begs the question: are his favourite take-out restaurants on the clipboard so he can place a quick order for after the game?

• Be part of Tait’s 8!

Share any good news, thoughts, secret grape jelly recipes, milestones or anything great. Connect by email cam.tait@sunmedia.ca

Tait’s 8 — Eight tid bits to help get you through the day

• Curtis Lazar will play his first professional hockey game Thursday night for the Ottawa Senators against the Edmonton Oilers. Curtis spent four years in Edmonton playing junior for the Oil Kings and is a great young man. He told Sun Media Wednesday he was planning to visit his billet family during his stay. Edmonton Sun hockey writer Brian Swane summed things up best: “Curtis might be thee nicest kid EVER,” says Brian.

Curtis hasn’t scored his first NHL goal. Wouldn’t it be … ?

• There’s a special recognition event Thursday at the DoubleTree by Hilton West Edmonton to honor Silvio Dobri who is retiring as a board member of the GoodHearts Transplant Foundation.  The group helps transplant patients in need of financial help. Silvio has done wonderful work for the group since becoming a transplant survivor several years ago.

• The big roast for 630 CHED’s Bryan Hall was last night at River  Cree.  So if he sounds a little fuzzy on the big 630 Morning News Thursday he has good reason. We’re not saying Bryan’s old, but we hear he was a waiter at the Last Supper.

• Wayne Lee and friends are hosting their annual Empowering Edmonton event Monday with all funds going to the Cerebral Palsy Association of Alberta. It’s a day of great stories shared by incredible people. Visit.empoweringalberta.com for more details.

• We’re sending best wishes to Oiler president of hockey operations Kevin Lowe and Don Metz of Aquila Productions. Both men recently had brief hospital stays. Both men, however, are fighters and will be back on their roads real soon.

• Mrs. Tait and I reflected earlier this week on celebrating 19 years of marriage. There are many things which have contributed to our happiness, including, of course, having two remote controls of the television.

• There’s a great — absolutely terrific — picture Mark Scholz shared on his Facebook page. Mark’s father Fred is visiting from Newfoundland and Mark snapped a shot of Fred having his nose squeezed by young Henry Scholz, Mark’s nine-month-old son.

• Canadians responded like never before on Remembrance Day in Ottawa in record numbers. We showed out appreciation and gratitude. And, I think, we’ll continue to do so in future years.